Two Job Openings at John Jay

26 11 2009

Assistant Professor of Philosophy, tenure track, beginning Fall 2010.  4-3 course load, semester system. Tenure-track faculty are eligible for a total of 24 hours of reassigned time in their first five years to engage in research and publication. We seek teachers and researchers committed to public higher education. Usual committee work and non-teaching duties. AOS: Philosophy of Law. AOC: Open. Qualifications: Ph.D. required for appointment to Assistant Professor; we will consider candidates within one year of completing their PhD for the rank of Instructor. Scholarly promise and demonstrated excellence in undergraduate teaching are required. Applicants should send a letter of application, CV, recent writing sample, three letters of recommendation, statement of teaching philosophy, sample syllabus, and teaching evaluations to Professor John P Pittman, Chairperson, Philosophy (Law Search), John Jay College of Criminal Justice, 899 Tenth Avenue, Suite 325T, New York, NY 10019. Complete applications must reach the department by 30 November 2009 for proper review. Faxed materials will NOT be accepted. The department will hold interviews at the APA Eastern Division Meeting in New York City, December 27-30,2009. Inquiries may be directed to the chairperson by email at jpittman@iiay.cuny.edu or by telephone at (212) 237-8331. John Jay College is an EO/AA/IRCA/ADA Employer.

 

Associate/Full Professor of Philosophy, Director of the Institute for Criminal Justice Ethics and Criminal Justice Ethics (Routledge) journal editor. Beginning Fall 2010. Ph.D. required. This appointment is envisioned at the Full Professor level; however, extraordinary candidates at a lower rank will be considered. Opportunity to teach in the Criminal Justice – and, through the CUNY Graduate Center — Philosophy doctoral programs. We seek a researcher and teacher committed to public higher education. AOS: Criminal Justice Ethics, or a willingness to move in the CJE direction and one of the following AOS: Professional Ethics/Applied Ethics, Human Rights, Political Philosophy; AOC: Open. Expectations: Distinguished scholarship and ideally national/international recognition. Editorial experience. Track record of grant achievement. Interest in organizing ICJE sponsored workshops/conferences. Demonstrated excellence in teaching. Applicants should send a letter of application, CV, recent writing sample, three letters of reference, sample syllabus, statement of teaching philosophy, and teaching evaluations to Professor John P Pittman, Chairperson, Philosophy (CJE Search), John Jay College of Criminal Justice, 899 Tenth Avenue, Suite 325T, New York, NY 10019. Complete applications must reach the department by 30 November 2009 for proper review. Faxed materials will NOT be accepted. The department will hold interviews at the APA Eastern Division Meeting in New York City, December 27-30,2009. Inquiries may be directed to the chairperson by email at jpittman@iav.cunv.eduor by telephone at (212) 237-8331. John Jay College is an EO/AA/IRCA/ADA Employer.

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CFP: Political Realism in Comparative Perspective

12 09 2009

CALL FOR PAPERS
POLITICAL REALISM IN COMPARATIVE PERSPECTIVE
PACIFIC DIVISION MEETING OF THE APA
MARCH 31 ­ APRIL 4, 2010
SAN FRANCISCO, CA

The International Society for the Comparative Study of Chinese and Western Philosophy (ISCWP) is seeking presentations on Hobbes, Machiavelli, or any major Western political thinker committed to developing political principles within constraints set by realistic accounts of human behavior and motivation. Topics might include (but are not limited to) Hobbesian views of human nature, moral or psychological egoism, or realist accounts of state legitimacy.

The chosen presenters will share a panel with experts in Chinese political philosophy, whose papers will focus on an influential school of political realists in China. All presenters must be open to giving comments and criticisms to the other panelists during the discussion period. However, no familiarity with Chinese philosophy is required or even expected.

Guidelines:
Submission Deadline: September 30, 2009.

1. To submit a paper proposal, please provide a 250-300 word abstract. Submissions need to include presenter’s name, institutional affiliation, paper title, and email address.

2. Announcement of papers and/or panels selected for presentation will be made in mid-October.

3. Address all submissions and inquires to: Professor Steve Angle, email: sangle@wesleyan.edu





CFP: Hegel After Spinoza

20 08 2009

 

Hegel After Spinoza: A Volume of Critical Essays  

Edited by Hasana Sharp and Jason Smith

Call for Papers

 

The names Hegel and Spinoza have come to represent two irreconcilable paths in contemporary philosophy.  This opposition has taken different forms, but has its roots in mid- to late-20th century French philosophy.  Althusser announced that he required a “detour” away from Hegel and through Spinoza in order to arrive at a genuinely materialist Marxism.  Pierre Macherey staged a careful deconstruction of Hegel’s claim to have superseded Spinoza’s system in Hegel ou Spinoza, which concomitantly served as a defence of Spinozism against the Hegelianism dominant in France in the 1960s and ‘70s.  Among the most influential articulations of this antagonism are the polemics of Deleuze celebrating the immanent and vitalist thinking of a materialist tradition beginning with Lucretius and passing through Spinoza to the present, to which he opposes the logic of totality, negativity, and contradiction found in Hegel.  Spinoza, for Deleuze and others, stands for a rejection of negativity and lack as the foundation of philosophical and political thought, and as a salutary alternative to the negativity (in both the logical and existential senses) associated not only with Hegel, but with Hobbes, Freud, Sartre, Heidegger, and Lévinas as well.  Feminists have likewise celebrated Spinoza as providing a joyful alternative to a tradition that emphasizes anxiety, mortality, and combat.  This opposition, in its various expressions, underscores that reading Hegel has always been and remains a political act. 

 

We are seeking essays to contribute to an anthology on the relationship between Spinoza and Hegel that move beyond the stalemate of current debates in continental philosophy.  The title we have proposed for this collection points toward a horizon that no longer opposes a “bad” Hegel to a “good” Spinoza; we seek essays that indicate how contemporary readings of Spinoza—no longer the thinker of absolute substance, but of immanent causality, singular connections, transindividuality, and the multitude—might illuminate otherwise less visible threads in Hegel’s thought, and open the way to a re-reading of Hegel, beyond the institutionalized figure we take for granted.  How might a productive and mutually enlightening encounter be produced between these two great systematic thinkers?  What political possibilities are opened up by reading Hegel and Spinoza as useful contrasts rather than moral alternatives?  The anthology will be published in a series that treats historical topics in light of contemporary continental thought.  We are open to a broad range of topics within this rubric, but are especially interested in new readings that avoid simply recapitulating either the pantheism controversy in 19th century Germany or the French polemics of the 20th century.

 

Please send papers of 7,500-10,000 words to:

 Hasana Sharp (hasana.sharp_at_mcgill.ca) or Jason Smith (Jason.Smith_at_Artcenter.edu) by 15 June, 2010